Title: The slut, the Spinster and the perfect woman
Dimensions: That would make the whole floor space 183cm x 304cm
Notes: durational Solo performative installation

Country: UK

BIOGRAPHY

Martha Mosse is a performance and visual artist who makes feminist work through the media of spandex, dance, and confrontational, durational art. The group and individual shows Mosse creates and direct stem from heightened representations of stereotypically female attributes. These attributes vary from physical activities like sewing, make-up, to the more physical or perceived features of the female body – soft, fleshy and pink. Martha studied ballet and contemporary dance while also experimenting with contemporary visual art and sculpture. These two interests ran alongside each other until she was pointed in the direction of the Performance and Visual Art (Dance) course at University of Brighton. It was there that she started to experiment with the relationship between spandex and the female body, her debut piece being a solo performance and film within a spandex box that analysed the anonymous woman. Martha graduated in 2012 with a First Class BA (Hons) and began to regularly perform at venues and festivals across the South including Brighton, London and Chichester. The venues ranged from traditional gallery settings to disused stables that she had to transform in a week. Martha has been a resident artist at DEBUT Contemporary gallery in Notting Hill since May 2013 and performs at their monthly Private View. Alongside this she is the co-director of Day As A Woman – an online feminist activist presence that communicates with the pubic to get real examples of sexism, then uses them in collaborative and solo performance pieces across the UK.

ARTIST STATEMENT

Body Sculpture is an innovative performative installation lasting 2 hours. An analysis of the female form striving for perfection, the work is an exploration of the lack of control women have over their own bodies in contemporary society, and examines how the ideal of perfection is used to oppress, define and limit women’s individuality and personality in the 21st century. Audiences are invited to look down upon the anguished female body and observe the battle for freedom from corporeal oppression. By confronting the audience with the oppressive, fleshy and tactile reality of feminine self-dissatisfaction, in a manner that blurs the boundaries of female corporeality, this work intends to challenge and confront the audience with the reality of what it means to be a woman.

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